Josh Philpot

Theology, the Church, and Music

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G. K. Beale on why the “Grammatical-Historical” approach isn’t enough

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“The usual ‘strict’ understanding of a ‘grammatical-historical’ approach is too limited in its scope, since it studies a passage primarily from only two angles: (1) investigation of only the human author’s viewpoint through a study of the historical, linguistic, grammatical, genre contexts, etc., of a passage; (2) the divine author can theoretically be left out of consideration until the ‘grammatical-historical’ study is complete, since the meaning sought for is only that of the human author. For example, even an interpreter who does not believe in divine inspiration must study a prophet like Isaiah from the viewpoint that Isaiah himself believed that he was inspired in what he wrote, and, therefore, that intention must be projected onto the process of interpreting Isaiah. How much more should this be the case for the believing exegete? Accordingly, this is only one example showing that considering divine intention should be part of a grammatical-historical approach. Thus, grammatical-historical exegesis and typology are two aspects of the same thing: hearing God speak in Scripture.”

G. K. Beale, “The Use of Hosea 11:1 in Matthew 2:15: One More Time,” JETS 55, no. 4 (2012): 700, fn. 14.

Written by Josh Philpot

January 24, 2013 at 3:59 pm

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T.S. Elliot on Wisdom and Education

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The values which we most ignore, the recognition of which we most seldom find in writings on education, are those of Wisdom and Holiness, the values of the sage and the saint. . . . Our tendency has been to identify wisdom with knowledge, saintliness with natural goodness, to minimize not only the operation of grace but self-training, to divorce holiness from education. Education has come to mean education of the mind only; and an education which is only of the mind . . . can lead to scholarship, to efficiency, to worldly achievement and to power, but not to wisdom.

T. S. Eliot, The Idea of a Christian Society and Other Writings (London: Faber and Faber, 1982), 142.

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August 24, 2012 at 6:45 pm

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Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament

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I’m excited to see the publication of the Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament, which is completely online and available to all. The first issue can be found here: http://jesot.org/issues/1-1-2012/

John Hobbins, who is on the editorial board, gives his assessment on his blog this morning, and his comments are intriguing. I would encourage anyone interested to check it out: Introducing JESOT

I read through Doug Stuart’s review of the new Exodus commentary by Victor Hamilton (Baker, 2011), which is illuminating to say the least. I hope to review this work through another journal, and I will give due attention to Stuart’s comments. In a gist, Stuart says that about 1/3 of Hamilton’s novel ideas are worth their salt. The rest are rubbish.

Written by Josh Philpot

June 5, 2012 at 12:48 pm

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Anecdote from D.A. Carson

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I like getting glimpses of the personal lives of respected scholars like D.A. Carson. This is a humorous illustration he uses for describing the spiritually immature Christians in 1 Cor 3:1-4, from “The Cross and Christian Ministry“:

When my daughter was born, my wife found herself unable to nurse our infant. That gave me the privilege of sharing the midnight feedings. Tiffany was a dream: I could zap the formula in the microwave, change her, feed her the whole eight ounces, and tuck her back into her crib—all in under twenty minutes. Then our son came along. Midnight feedings with him were horrendous. Although he had an enormous appetite, he sucked and drank with only three speeds: slow, dead-slow, and stop. Worse, he had to be burped every ounce or so—a painfully slow process—or he would display his remarkable gift for projectile vomiting. Without any warning, he could upchuck what he had taken in and send it fiteen feet across the room. If there were an Olympic event in projectile vomiting, he would have taken one of the medals. I never got him back into his crib in under an hour; an hour and a half was more common. 

Here is how he applies the illustration:

At least he had an excuse. He was young, and his digestive system was obviously not as well-developed as his sister’s at the same age. Best of all, he quickly outgrew this stage. But there are Christians who are international-class projectile vomiters, spiritual speaking, after years and years of life. They simply cannot digest what Paul calls “solid food.” You must give them milk, for they are not ready for anything more. And if you try to give them anything other than milk, they upchuck and make a mess of everyone and everything around them. At some point the number of years they have been Christians leads you to expect something like mature behavior from them, but they prove disappointing. They are infants still and display their wretched immaturity even in the way that they complain if you give them more than milk. Not for them solid knowledge of Scripture; not for them mature theological reflection; not for them growing and perceptive Christian thought. They want nothing more than another round of choruses and a “simple message”—something that won’t challenge them to think, to examine their lives, to make choices, and to grow in their knowledge and adoration of the living God (pg. 72).

Written by Josh Philpot

April 16, 2012 at 1:50 pm

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Customize OSX

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Simple Terminal commands are the easiest way to customize your desktop experience on a Mac. Every now and then I’ll look for new commands because I like to play around with the OS on my laptop and experiment with different looks or controls. A user over at Github recently posted the 65 best terminal commands in OSX Lion. I’ve already implemented a few: https://github.com/mathiasbynens/dotfiles/blob/master/.osx

Written by Josh Philpot

April 10, 2012 at 12:20 pm

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New ESV/BHS Diglot from Crossway

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Yesterday I received Crossway’s new ESV/BHS diglot Old Testament. It’s bigger and bulkier than I had hoped, and the pages are super thin so that I can see right through them to the text on the other side. But even so, I’m happy to have a diglot with the ESV text, which I prefer and which is the version that our pastor uses. Here are a few pics:

Image

If you’re interested in other diglots of the OT I would suggest the JPS Tanak, the NKJV/Hebrew, or KJV/Hebrew, all published by the American Bible Society. I don’t know of others. I also have the NA27/NET Bible for the NT. 

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March 30, 2012 at 2:46 am

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Best Version of “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing”

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Robert Robinson’s hymn, “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing,” is frequently sung in churches around the world each Sunday. This Sunday I again share the privilege of leading congregation worship with this hymn. What most Christians don’t know is that the version in their hymnals is abbreviated. My friend, Andrew Case, pointed me to the original 5-verse hymn in 2008, and I’ve been using it ever since. The lyrics are even more profound in the original, and the hymn just makes more sense. I’m posting this version below for good reference, which you can find on Wikipedia. In my opinion, the best recorded version I have ever heard of this song is by Andrew Case, which you can download at his website here. I enjoyed collaborating with Andrew on this recording, and you can hear me playing the piano in the background.

1. Come, Thou Fount of every blessing,
Tune my heart to sing Thy grace;
Streams of mercy, never ceasing,
Call for songs of loudest praise.
Teach me some melodious sonnet,
Sung by flaming tongues above.
Praise the mount, I’m fixed upon it,
Mount of Thy redeeming love.

2. Sorrowing I shall be in spirit,
Till released from flesh and sin,
Yet from what I do inherit,
Here Thy praises I’ll begin;
Here I raise my Ebenezer;
Here by Thy great help I’ve come;
And I hope, by Thy good pleasure,
Safely to arrive at home.

3. Jesus sought me when a stranger,
Wandering from the fold of God;
He, to rescue me from danger,
Interposed His precious blood;
How His kindness yet pursues me
Mortal tongue can never tell,
Clothed in flesh, till death shall loose me
I cannot proclaim it well.

4. O to grace how great a debtor
Daily I’m constrained to be!
Let Thy goodness, like a fetter,
Bind my wandering heart to Thee.
Prone to wander, Lord, I feel it,
Prone to leave the God I love;
Here’s my heart, O take and seal it,
Seal it for Thy courts above.

5. O that day when freed from sinning,
I shall see Thy lovely face;
Clothèd then in blood washed linen
How I’ll sing Thy sovereign grace;
Come, my Lord, no longer tarry,
Take my ransomed soul away;
Send thine angels now to carry
Me to realms of endless day.

Written by Josh Philpot

December 18, 2011 at 2:28 pm

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Charles Halton on Authors or Criminals

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Charles Halton has recently penned an interesting blog on authorship, plagiarism and authority. Then John Meade and Jim Hamilton added some critical comments, and the ensuing discussion is worth a look.

Written by Josh Philpot

August 5, 2010 at 2:25 am

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14 Famous Man Caves

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One thing I really enjoy is getting a chance to peek into the offices and libraries of famous writers, historians, and politicians. So I had a lot of fun reading this post from the Art of Manliness site (a great blog, if you’ve never been there), which highlights (with photos) fourteen offices of famous men in history: 14 Famous Man Caves

It’s a lot of fun if you like history and libraries! Jefferson’s study is the only one that I’ve visited:

I’d much rather visit Teddy Roosevelt’s trophy room!

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July 28, 2010 at 11:04 am

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Hymns on Piano

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Here are twelve hymns I recorded on piano for my wife as a birthday gift in April (she really liked it!). I thought some of you may enjoy them. Many thanks to Andrew Case for the mix, and to Clifton Baptist Church for letting me use their piano!

I Will Glory in My Redeemer

In Christ Alone

Amazing Grace

Before the Throne of God Above

Come Thou Fount

Holy, Holy, Holy

How Sweet and Aweful is the Place

Jesus, What a Friend for Sinners

My Jesus, I Love Thee

The Power of the Cross

Trust and Obey

I Surrender All

I had to minimize the files, so unfortunately the quality is not the best. Also, most of these were recorded on the first take so you may hear mistakes here or there (i.e. copyist errors…).

Written by Josh Philpot

June 28, 2010 at 1:00 am

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